Point Lookout Lighthouse Hauntings

March 7th, 2011 - Category: Real Haunted Places

Most Haunted Places in America: Point Lookout Lighthouse

Point Lookout Lighthouse is a historic landmark on the coast of Maryland. The lighthouse is situated within Point Lookout State Park, but is no longer operational, at least not in the practical sense of the word. According to local folklore, the ghosts of Point Lookout Lighthouse remain quite active in their duties.

Erected in 1830 by draftsman John Donahoo, the Point Lookout Lighthouse was commissioned five years prior when the federal government deemed it necessary to establish an illumining warning to sailors of the shoals at the mouth of the Potomac River.

The Point Lookout Lighthouse is quite unique in the sense that it really was created in the fashion of a traditional house, rather than the standard lighthouse of cylindrical, elevated design. The circular edifice that encases the light itself is the same, but below this point is a story and a half of customary dwelling. The lighthouse debuted its beam on September 20, 1830.

In 1883, an additional story was built onto the Point Lookout Lighthouse to enable two employees and their families to reside within the home, thereby sharing the duties of the lighthouse.

The haunting of Point Lookout Lighthouse goes well beyond the lighthouse itself as the entire state park has its own ghostly legends, dating back through the Civil War. This rolled over to the lighthouse as well, as Confederate soldiers clashed with the Union army and prisoners were held hostage within the lighthouse.

This explains the mass of EVP recordings collected by paranormal investigators over the last 40 years. More than two dozen individual, disembodied voices have been caught on tape, including male and female voices. “Fire if they get close to you”, and “Let us not take objection to what they are doing” were two very clearly recorded EVPs that are easily believed to come from ghosts dating back to this era.

Point Lookout Lighthouse is haunted by several spectral ghosts as well, including that of Ann Davis, the wife of the original keeper of the lighthouse. Reports of her ghosts manifesting at the top of the stairs have come in on numerous occasions, often wearing a long blue skirt and white blouse.

Pictorial evidence of paranormal activity at Point Lookout Lighthouse has been captured, but none so famous as “The Ghost of Point Lookout”, a prominent photo taken in the late 1970’s during a séance.

The photo depicted former lighthouse resident Laura Berg grasping a candle in her hand in the center of the picture, while an apparition of a soldier sat idly in the corner of the room. He was clad in full combat gear, sash and weapon. He had one leg comfortably crossed over the other as he leaned against the wall. No one present at the séance actually noticed the gentleman at the time, but the picture indubitably revealed his presence.

Point Lookout Lighthouse still stands on the shore of Chesapeake Bay, but its duties were replaced by an automated light system after the Navy purchased the structure in 1965. The lighthouse remained occupied with residents up until 1981, but is now little more than a historical landmark and source of paranormal interest.

3 Responses to “Point Lookout Lighthouse Hauntings”


  1. Emma Kelley
    on Jun 6th, 2011
    @ 3:31 pm

    Oh my gosh i live in maryland and this creeps me out. i am doing a report on haunted buildings specificly ones in maryland and this is on the list


  2. Jim Nicholson
    on Sep 15th, 2011
    @ 8:11 am

    I am very interested in the paranormal.If there is a paranormal team out there that would like an extra hand,camera and digital recorder,Id love to be that peson.Ive caught a few EVPs and a couple pics.Id love to join or even accompany you on an investigation. Thank you,Jimmy Nicholson p.s.hope you at least think about it,Thanks


  3. Jim Nicholson
    on Sep 15th, 2011
    @ 8:13 am

    I am in the St.Marys county area in Southern Md. Hope to hear from you or any team in the area.

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