Patients Haunting Fairfield Hills State Hospital

June 30th, 2010 - Category: Real Haunted Places

Most Haunted Places in America: Fairfield Hills Mental Institution

The Fairfield (or Fairfield Hills) State Hospital, sometimes simply referred to as Fairfield Hills, is an abandoned old mental institution for the mentally and/or criminally insane located in Newtown, Connecticut. Though the living no longer reside here, it is said that many ghosts haunt the Fairfield Hills Mental Institution.

The Fairfield Hills State Hospital was built upon 100 acres of land at the request of the State of Connecticut due to overcrowding in its other two state mental hospitals. The state contracted Walter P. Crabtree, Jr. to design the structure, which was fabricated from red brick in the common colonial style of those times.

The original hospital was made up of 16 buildings, connected on the outside by a circular network of paved pathways, and underground by a series of concrete tunnels. Certainly the tunnels were meant for convenience, but what they became was a hidden means of transferring patients, both living and deceased, from one area to another without notice.

Construction took place mostly throughout 1930, and Fairfield Hills finally opened its doors in June of 1931, accepting transfer patients from Connecticut Valley Hospital. In its early days, Fairfield Hills State Hospital housed no more than 500 patients, occupied by just 3 doctors.

In the 1940’s and 50’s, Fairfield Hills was extended with more buildings to accommodate the growing patient population. By the 1960’s Fairfield Hills Mental Institution was terribly overcrowded with more than 4,000 patients, plus 20 doctors, 50 nurses and at least 100 other employees of variable duties.

The reprehensible deeds that went on at Fairfield Hills over the years were not approved by the state – at least not officially – and some even proved fatal to the patients of the mental institution. Treatments included seclusion, hydrotherapy, lobotomy, electric shock therapy and shock therapy by administering the drugs metrazol and insulin. Psychosurgery was performed on more than 100 patients in the first year of its use.

Fairfield Hills was, in reality, more of an experimental institution than a rehabilitation center. Countless patients were essentially tortured for the ‘good of the medical practice’. Finally, in 1995, hospitals for the mentally and criminally insane had gone out of style, so to speak. Other methods of rehabilitation had superseded the need for Fairfield Hills, and it was shut down by the state.

Past patients and employees alike have told tales of the strange, paranormal activity that went on there. The Greenwich House is one building that is said to bring on an overwhelming feeling of despair and suffering. This particular building was destroyed in a massive fire that is said to have been started by a man who thought it would be fun to take a bottle of lighter fluid to the linen closet and toss in a match.

Strange noises have been reported from all areas of Fairfield Hills, from whispers and moans to outright screams echoing throughout the hallways. The clacking rattle of old gurney wheels have been said to traveling hallways and the underground corridors especially. The morgue is particularly animated with resounding, inexplicable noises.

During its last few years of operation, various electronic machines and appliances were rumored to turn on and off of their own accord.

Nothing is known to occur in Fairfield Hills as it stands today. The state mental institution was shut down officially in 1995, and to thwart curious trouble-seekers and hoards of ghost hunting investigators, the hospital has been completely closed off and is patrolled by numerous police cars on a nightly basis.

In 2009, the town of Newton, CT had the underground passages sealed off. If you attempt to visit Fairfield Hills Mental Institution today, you’ll find it incredibly difficult, if not virtually impossible, to sneak past the patrols. They vigorously guard the facility on all sides and are ready and willing to arrest anyone attempting to sneak onto the property.

10 Responses to “Patients Haunting Fairfield Hills State Hospital”


  1. Sable
    on Oct 3rd, 2010
    @ 4:25 pm

    I saw this flaw and I had to comment, this is actually located in Newtown Connecticut, not sure where the Newton came from. (This is when spell check doesn’t always work). I did a documentary about ff-hills back in my freshmen year of high school and we toured the grounds including just about all of the buildings and morgue, we did hear a strange sound one time, when we were left alone without the tour guide, we heard a muffled high pitch scream, and just to make sure that it wasn’t the security guard we were watching him walk outside just as we heard the sound. Other then that there is a lot of unsettling feelings while inside of these buildings, there is a lot of floating orbs in the photos that we had taken, and you can just feel the pain and see what those who were residing would have been experiencing. Now it is all shut down and locked up so that now one can get in, be careful if you dare to enter though as there is a lot of dangerous things in these buildings.. go to the website to see some personal photos and read some live experiences from people who were patients and used to work at the hills.

    - Sable


  2. Ghost Writer
    on Oct 3rd, 2010
    @ 4:46 pm

    Thanks Sable, it is fixed.


  3. laura
    on Mar 10th, 2011
    @ 9:16 pm

    i stayed the night at fairfield hills in 1986,the childrens pshyciatric ward was still open . although i believe in the haunting of the hospital , i didnt experience anything in apt house , but a need to go home !


  4. ted
    on Mar 24th, 2011
    @ 7:16 pm

    I worked at Kent 3C in the ’60s


  5. ted
    on Mar 28th, 2011
    @ 12:41 pm

    Bunk, these people were severly sick, and were treated well. This haunting thing is nonsense.


  6. Thia
    on Apr 30th, 2011
    @ 5:16 pm

    Laura,
    I too was a patient of Bridgewater House in 1986. What part of the hospital did you reside in? BTU or Adam House?


  7. smd
    on Jun 25th, 2011
    @ 1:44 pm

    honestly stfu. because were not talking about the present retard. there talking about its old history, and go ahead and say you dont believe evryone has their own opinion. but shits truee, you probably didnt think so becuase you were pyscotic patient there as you said. just saying


  8. urban ghost hunters
    on Jan 14th, 2012
    @ 12:16 am

    True Story, the nite before attempting an exploration through Fairfield Hills under a full moon we strolled through the abandoned Wingdale complex another compelling haunted area. Where we not only felt the presence but heard wat sounded like crys of agony and despair. A quick visit was all that time, cold temperatures, and an unexplained event allowed. A pregnat team member waz push to the ground while attempting to flee a genuine haunting located at the main entrance of the asylum. Story continued on next blog —-


  9. urban ghost hunters
    on Jan 14th, 2012
    @ 12:54 am

    While walking away from Wingdale the feeling of watching eyes from the old hospital’s steel fenced windows gave us chills as we stepped off the overgrown landscape. State troopers followed our vehicle all the way down Route 22 and up 311 with no pull over attemp. The following day our ghost hunting adventures landed us at Dudley Town and the little peoples village that two other strange and haunted sites which stories I will share if anyone wants details from our experiences, regretfully the spooky Fairfield Hills mental hospital was gaurded well by security making our first attempt only a drive by, however the property and its buildings are out of a hollywood horror film. All great haunted locations full of supernatural activity that deserve one more good pass through by our team. We will be bak with more urban ghost hunting files.


  10. Jennafer
    on Jun 12th, 2012
    @ 6:12 am

    I too was a patient in the summer of 1986. I was in the BTU from June to August 1986. Was anyone else there at that time?

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